Saving Haiti’s Mothers

Now on PBS, January 29, 2010

The BIR travels to Haiti just days before the earthquake to report on the problem of maternal mortality.

 

BIR Video Gallery

Bosnia’s Troubled History

PBS Worldfocus, January 6, 2010

The BIR reports on the role of history in shaping Bosnia's society in the wake of its brutal civil war.

Fragile States, Part IV

Haiti’s Moment of Hope

PBS NewsHour, January 11, 2010

Airing less than 24 hours before the earthquake, this report looks at progress made in the Caribbean nation.

Fragile States, Part III

Bosnia’s Fragile Peace

PBS NewsHour, November 18, 2009

A look at current political and social tensions and the role of the international community in Bosnia & Herzegovina.

Can the UN Keep the Peace?

Now on PBS and HDNet World Report

May 15, 2009

An investigation from the Democratic Republic of the Congo on the United Nation’s largest peacekeeping operation in the world, MONUC.

Fragile States, a four part series for PBS NewsHour:

Fragile States, Part II

East Timor: 10 Years On

PBS NewsHour, November 14, 2009

An examination of nation-building in Asia’s newest country, 10 years after its people voted for independence from Indonesia.

Fragile States, Part I

Troubles in Congo

PBS NewsHour, August 11, 2009

The BIR tours the province of North Kivu with Alan Doss, Special Representative in charge of the UN’s peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Justice Delayed

PBS NewsHour, December 18, 2006

Cambodia prepares tribunals for crimes committed under the brutal Khmer Rouge regime.

Russian, Muslim and at Peace

PBS Foreign Exchange, February 23, 2009

A look at religious co-existence in Tatarstan, an autonomous republic of the Russian Federation.

Crisis in the Caucasus

PBS NewsHour and HDNet World Report

August 19, 2008

The BIR was on the ground inside the disputed territory of Abkhazia just hours before the Russian/Georgian war. This rare access show the roots of the conflict that made a cold war red hot.

Uganda’s Silent War

PBS NewsHour and HDNet World Report

April 26, 2007

Winner of the 2008 Robert F Kennedy Journalism Award, this BIR report looks at the impact of arrest warrants issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) on the war in Northern Uganda.

Australia’s Pacific Overture

IRP Fellowship, April 2004

A report on the Australia’s mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) and the increased security role Canberra is taking in the region.

Most recent work:

Earlier segments:

The Global Race for Rare Earth Metals

PBS NewsHour, June 14, 2010

From Canada’s Northwest Territories to Inner Mongolia to the California desert, the race is on to find new supplies of rare earth metals, key ingredients in many critical defense and green technologies.

Scars of Genocide Linger as Rwanda Faces Election

PBS NewsHour, August 9, 2010

The BIR travels to Rwanda as the nation prepares for presidential elections and reports on political and economic developments 16 years after genocide.

Bosnian Women Battle Breast Cancer

PBS NewsHour, October 26, 2010

In a country still very much identified with its civil war that ended 15 years ago, the leading cause of death among Bosnian women is breast cancer. The BIR reports on efforts to stop the deadly disease.

New Generation of Bosnians Head to the Polls

PBS NewsHour, October 1, 2010

The BIR reports on Bosnia’s elections and a new wave of first-time voters, the generation that grew up during or after the country’s brutal ethnic war.

In Lebanon, Assassination Inquiry Proves Divisive

PBS NewsHour, February 3, 2011

The BIR travels to Lebanon to investigate the impact of the tribunal looking into the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri on peace and stability in this fragile nation.

Nearly 8 Years after the ‘Orange Revolution’, Ukraine Runs into Reversals

PBS NewsHour, May 10, 2011

Ukraine offers a cautionary tale to democratic uprisings across the Arab world as it runs into charges of increased authoritarianism and political backsliding just years after its ‘Orange Revolution’.

Ukraine Struggles to Curb HIV Epidemic Amid Drug Shortages, Political Hurdles

PBS NewsHour, May 11, 2011

The BIR reports on efforts to contain Ukraine’s growing HIV/AIDS epidemic through both prevention and treatment programs. Ukraine has Europe’s highest rate of HIV infection and more HIV positive citizens than France, Germany and the UK combined.

Liberia Struggles to Build Democracy After Civil War

PBS NewsHour, October 4, 2011

On the eve of presidential elections, the BIR travels to Liberia to report on the country's path towards democracy and development and on the record of of its incumbent, 2011 Nobel Laureate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

War Ravaged Liberia Faces Challenge of Mental Health Care

PBS NewsHour, October 5, 2011

With an estimated 40% of Liberia's population suffering from post traumatic stress disorder as a result of 14 years of civil war, mental health care is both a medical and security imperative.

Liberia's Natural Resources Are Both Blessing and Curse

PBS NewsHour, October 31, 2011

The BIR reports on efforts to manage Liberia's abundant natural resources and avoid the curse that has effected its neighbors and indeed its own history.

Myanmar Newsrooms: Proving Grounds for Nascent Freedoms

PBS NewsHour, March 30, 2012

As Burma holds landmark elections and former political opposition members head to parliament, the BIR looks at the fragile growth of media and civil society in this once repressive nation. Ko Ko Gyi, one of the student leaders of the political uprising of 1988, and until recently a political prisoner of the military regime, shares his thoughts on his country's future.

Myanmar Prepares for Elections, Tests Out a Freer Society

PBS NewsHour, March 29, 2012

The BIR heads out on the campaign trail with democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi as she campaigns for a seat in Myanmar's parliament. This report also takes a rare look inside the country's secretive new capital city, Naypyitaw and speaks to US Special Representative Derek Mitchell about what these elections mean for a country now emerging from decades of isolation.

Thailand Grapples with Deadly Tensions Between Muslims, Buddhists

PBS NewsHour, February 21, 2012

The BIR travels to Thailand's "Deep South", its four southernmost provinces, which have experienced a Malay Muslim insurgency resulting in over 5,000 deaths since 2004.

This was the debut report of the BIR's new series Fault Lines of Faith, produced with support from the Luce Foundation and aired on PBS NewsHour.

Peace in Northern Ireland, but Sectarian Divides Remain

PBS NewsHour, July 11, 2012

14 years after a landmark peace agreement settled the 30 years of violence known as The Troubles, Northern Ireland is largely at peace. Yet under the surface sectarian divisions remain strong and tensions come to a boil every summer during the so-called Marching Season, when the Unionist Orange Order stage a series of marches, some passing Republican neighborhoods and stoking tensions.

Imperfect Justice in Cambodia

PBS Need to Know, June 8, 2012

For the lead segment on PBS Need to Know's special program looking at International Justice, the BIR returned to Cambodia for an update report on the progress of the Khmer Rouge tribunal

The Battle Over Northern Ireland's Secret Archive

PBS NewsHour, August 23, 2012

A legal battle has erupted over the release of confidential interviews with former combatants of "The Troubles". On behalf of British Law Enforcement, the US Department of Justice has subpoenaed several recordings being held at Boston College, in hopes of solving a 40 year old murder. It's a fascinating case that raises competing interests of US First Amendment law, peace in a still-fragile Northern Ireland, and potential justice for a horrible crime.

Kenyans Return to Polls to Test Progress Since 2007

PBS NewsHour, February 26, 2013

After the disputed presidential election of December 2007, Kenya fell into chaos as neighbors from different ethnic groups turned on each other in violence. Five years later, Kenyans return to the polls. The BIR examines what progress has been made and what fragilities remain.

In India, Modi is a Popular, Polarizing Figure

PBS NewsHour, December 18, 2012

Narendra Modi, chief minister of the Indian state of Gujarat, is running for a fourth term, and many believe he will be India's next prime minister. But Modi is dogged by controversy over anti-Muslim pogroms what occurred under his watch in 2002. Can his reputation as an efficient administrator overcome fears of religious intolerance as Modi shifts to the national stage in a country with the world's largest Muslim minority?

Repairing Relations in Kenya's Coastal Region

PBS NewsHour, April 4, 2013

The BIR travels to Mombasa, Kenya to report on efforts by an interfaith group of clerics to contain simmering tensions between Muslims and Christians.

Myanmar Democracy Transition Marred by Anti-Muslim Rhetoric and Violence

PBS NewsHour, June 18, 2013

Reporting from the scenes of recent anti-Muslim violence, the BIR explores the rise of a new Buddhist nationalism in Myanmar, spearheaded by controversial monk Wirathu and his 969 movement.

 

In Race to Develop Myanmar, Government Grabs Farmland

PBS NewsHour, July 17, 2013

As international investors rush to Myanmar to take advantage of an newly opened economy, decades-old disputes over land seizures by the military government threaten to complicate progress.

Push for National Census Reveals Scars of Bosnia's Painful Past

PBS NewsHour, October 10, 2013

As Bosnia and Herzegovina conducts its first census since before its brutal ethnic war, its three constituent peoples -- Bosniaks, Serbs and Croats -- jockey for numerical advantage, as a fourth force advocates dropping ethnicity entirely.